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7 ex-Illinois players file $10 million lawsuit

Today, seven former Illinois women's basketball players filed a $10 million federal lawsuit against the university. It was filed under the Civil Rights Act.

Brett Carlsen-USA TODAY Sports

Earlier today, it was announced that seven former Illinois players have filed a federal lawsuit against the university.

These past few months have been a rough one for Illinois women's basketball coach, Matt Bollant. There have been many aspersions on how the he handled things since he's been at the helm.

His program has come under fire with serious allegations of abuse, from verbal to even racist remarks. Now seven players have filed a $10 million federal lawsuit against the university, per multiple reports.

Here is a portion of the report by The News-Gazette:

"The suit, filed in federal court in Urbana on Wednesday morning, names Bollant, Divilbiss, athletic director Mike Thomas and the university board of trustees as defendants and seeks $10 million in damages.

The players named in the suit are Amarah Coleman, Taylor Gleason, Jacqui Grant, Sarah Livingston, Nia Oden, Alexis Smith and Taylor Tuck.

According to the suit, during the 2013-14 and 14-15 women's basketball seasons, Bollant and Divilbiss created a racially hostile environment through segregation and separate treatment of players by race.

Among the allegations:

— Coaches held segregated practices

— Coaches prohibited white players from rooming with black players on road trips

— When the Illini played predominantly black teams, the coaches asked the black players what they thought the other team was going to do. When the Illini played predominantly white teams, the coaches asked the white players.

— The coaches called predominantly black teams "undisciplined and unintelligent" while referring to predominantly white teams as "disciplined and intelligent.

— Calling one or more of the black plaintiffs unintelligent, undisciplined and "west-side ghetto."

— Coaches held more severe discipline for black players and white players despite similar conduct.

— The coaches encouraged or helped the "favored" white players improve when they played poorly, while black players and white teammates who associated with them were "insulted, denigrated, demeaned, demoralized and/or embarrassed" if they made mistakes. The coaches also addressed the players in a denigrating manner in team meetings and practices. The conduct was designed to coerce the plaintiffs to quit the team, surrender their scholarships or transfer, the lawsuit said.

— Coaches held more severe discipline for black players and white players despite similar conduct.

First, his top assistant Mike Divibiss resigned, unexpectedly, from his position. Later it came out that he stepped down because of accusations of verbal and mental abuse. Then the university announced that they would be doing an investigation, then an outside firm decided to conduct a review as well.

Now with this federal lawsuit, this situation has reached a boiling point of sorts, where Bollant's status with the program could be in jeopardy. The lawsuit can viewed in its entirety here.